One Nation leader Pauline Hanson compares Anthony Albanese to Russian dictator as she issues grim warning about Australia’s future

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson compares Anthony Albanese to Russian dictator as she issues grim warning about Australia’s future

By Antoinette Melinos for Daily Mail Australia

03:13 16 November 2023, updated 03:24 16 November 2023



Pauline Hanson has issued a grim warning about Australia’s future as she compared Anthony Albanese to a murderous Russian dictator.

The One Nation leader delivered a speech to the Senate on Wednesday titled “Brace Yourselves: Australia’s Dystopian Future Under Albanian Rule.”

In her speech, Senator Hanson likened Australia’s future under Labour, the Greens and the Coalition to that of the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin.

Stalin, who ruled the Soviet Union from 1924 until his death in 1953, is believed to have killed at least 6 million people detained in forced labor camps – a Soviet network of forced labor camps.

Senator Hanson claimed Australians would remain confined to their homes and work for “nothing” if the country continued to push for things like more renewable energy projects and a cashless society.

She warned that Sunday steak and roast lamb dinners would become a thing of the past and would be replaced by a mixture of meals including lentils and vermicelli.

Pauline Hanson has issued a grim warning about Australia’s future as she compared Anthony Albanese to a murderous Russian dictator
The One Nation leader delivered a speech to the Senate on Wednesday titled “Get Ready: Australia’s dystopian future under Albanian rule”.

“Well, I’ll give you an idea of ​​the future of Australia under Labour, the Greens and the Coalition – well, those without a backbone,” Senator Hanson said.

“You will toil much longer for less, and ultimately for nothing, just as they did in the old Soviet Union under Joe Stalin.”

Data from the June quarter Wage Price Index showed that for most workers, wages are still failing to keep pace with inflation.

Read more: Pauline Hanson slams alleged rape victim Bruce Lerman in dousing unidentified woman – claiming ‘public execution of men has become a national sport’

The wage price index fell in June to 3.6 per cent, down from an annual pace of 3.7 per cent in March – although average wages rose by 0.8 per cent.

This represents the first annual decline in growth since the September quarter of 2020 following national coronavirus lockdowns.

Senator Hanson criticized Mr Albanese’s commitment to transition to green energy, claiming the government would confine Australians to their homes to combat greenhouse gas emissions.

“You’ll be confined to your suburb or your rural town, and you won’t be able to move beyond its borders because it will emit too many greenhouse gases,” Senator Hanson said.

“There will be no getting around this, because all your biometric data will be used to keep you under surveillance.”

The Prime Minister signed Australia up to join the G7-backed “Climate Club” in July this year after pledging to cut the country’s greenhouse gas emissions and turn it into a renewable energy superpower.

Mr Albanese announced Labour’s “most pressing climate change policy ever” during his election campaign.

The policy aims to create 604,000 jobs, reduce average household energy prices by $275 a year by 2025 and $378 by 2035, and cut emissions by 43 percent by 2030, according to a model commissioned by the Labor Party.

Stalin, who was General Secretary of the Communist Party that ruled the Soviet Union from 1941 to 1953, is believed to have killed at least 6 million people held in forced labor camps – a Soviet network of forced labor camps.
Senator Hanson said Australians should say “goodbye” to steak and lamb, claiming that in Australia’s dystopian future, Australians would eat a diet of insects and worms mixed with lentil mash used for feeding (pictured, Australians having a barbecue on Coogee Beach on Australia) )

In her speech, Senator Hanson also suggested Australians should travel abroad now and visit relatives before it becomes too expensive to “hoard” the Australian dollar – which currently stands at $0.64.

The Australian dollar rose to US$0.65 on Wednesday in its biggest daily gain in 12 months – but it is still down 4.5 per cent this year.

Senator Hanson also encouraged Australians to prepare to change their diet from Sunday steak and lamb roast dinners to insects and worms.

“Say goodbye to Sunday steak and lamb roast dinners and prepare your taste buds for a diet of insects and worms mixed with foraged lentil mash,” said Senator Hanson.

The wild statement made United Australia Senator Ralph Babbitt – who was sitting behind Hanson – laugh.

In Senator Hanson’s dystopian future, cash will also be a thing of the past along with reliable electricity and fresh water.

The Reserve Bank, a wholesale distributor of banknotes, revealed that commercial banks’ requests for cash fell to a new low during the last financial year.

With major banks such as the Commonwealth and ANZ now operating cashless branches, the $3.1 billion worth of new notes ordered by these banks in 2022-23 was “about a third of a typical year’s issuance”.

In the year to June, 424 bank branches were closed, the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority revealed in October, with the number of branches falling by more than a third, or 37 per cent, since June 2017.

“Forget about cash, how dare you even think about making a transaction that is not monitored and needs approval,” Senator Hanson said.

“Forget about the need for reliable on-demand electricity. As is the case in Third World Africa – and even in North Queensland – you will be buying your share of electricity ahead of time.

The UN leader also urged Australians to give up the ‘Australian dream’ of owning a home (pictured, auction in Paddington, Sydney)

“These smart meters you have installed will ensure that you can only use them when the government allows you to.” The same applies to your fresh water.

Senator Hanson asked Australians to “give up the great Australian dream” of owning a home, and cited a 2016 video by World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab who said: “You’ll own nothing and you’ll be happy.”

Senator Hanson said: “You’ll be glad your government says so, and woe to the poor Australian who dares to say he’s not subject to disinformation laws.”

“Welcome to the future, Australia, coming much sooner than you think thanks to your government. Unless of course you are super rich.

Sydney has been ranked as the second least affordable city in the world, receiving the dubious honor for the second year in a row from the organisation. Demographics International Housing Affordability Report.

The vacancy rate for residential rental properties nationally continued to decline to 1 percent in October, according to SQM Research.

While asking rents in capital cities rose by 0.7 per cent in the 30 days to November 12 – contributing to a 15.5 per cent increase over the past year.

The number of residential properties across the country also declined, falling to 0.9 percent, while combined housing prices rose 1.2 percent – to a record average of $805,680.

Senator Hanson shared her letter on the social media platform X and received mixed responses from social media users.

This comes after Senator Hanson called for a ban on welcoming rituals in the country

Some agreed with the politician and thanked her for speaking out about controversial topics.

‘Thank you for voicing your opinion! “People need to speak up on this issue,” one person wrote.

Another person commented: “Well Pauline said she was one of the last politicians to do this for Australians and was ridiculed for doing her job.”

Others disagreed with the senator, claiming her speech was full of “far-fetched garbage.”

“For a number of reasons, I’ve never used the term ‘cooked’ before.” . . “But here, Pauline, you are completely cooked,” one person remarked.

“Sorry, Pauline, but everything you heard was just far-fetched nonsense… You had a chance to make a strong, legitimate argument and blew it for a childish argument… All we ask is that you do your job realistically and professionally,” she said again. The person wrote.

A third person echoed: “I can never tell if this is a parody or real?”

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