More on the ideological polarization (and erosion) of science – Why is evolution true?

More on the ideological polarization (and erosion) of science – Why is evolution true?

This time it’s a chemistry course at Rice University. Here’s the poster. (The Black Lives Matter Study tells you this is purely ideological.)

the description.

African chemistry: Examining Black Lives Matter (KIM 125) It will debut spring 24. In this interdisciplinary course, students will explore The intersection of racial justice and chemistry. We will approach chemistry using a historical and contemporary African American lens in order to analyze science and its impact. In addition, we will use chemical concepts to better understand black life in the United States. Because we not only think about what science is being discovered, but also ask why, how, by whom, etc., this course will enable students to think about STEM approaches that enhance societal impact. CHEM 125 is open to students of all majors, regardless of STEM or African American Studies background (counts toward the AAAS minor). Preview the chapter Wednesday, November 8, from 7 to 8 p.m In MCC. Contact Dr. Brooke Johnson (email redacted) if you have questions.

Is it even? maybe Do you now want to keep ideology out of science, and refrain from exploiting science to advance your personal “progressive” principles? Although students get credit for this in Rice University’s AAAS minor (African and African American Studies), can one get credit for science as well? I do not wish. Regardless, he taints science by confusing it with “progressive” activism.

Here’s how the course violates academic principles by urging specific political action:

. . . . . This course will enable students to think about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) approaches that enhance societal impact.

Now what, do you suppose, he does Which He means?

What does it mean to “use chemical concepts to better understand black life in the United States”?

On Brooke Johnson’s faculty page, which describes her as a “teacher” in the DEI office, she says the following:

Dr. Brooke Johnson joined the DEI team as an instructor after earning her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Princeton University (’23). A Rice alumna (’17) and former Rice track athlete, Dr. Johnson is passionate about the intersection of science and social justice and uses her unique experiences to teach, support, and inspire diverse students.

I thought about making a satirical version of the poster promoting either “Latin alchemy” (actually “Latin alchemy”) or “Jewish alchemy,” but that’s not necessary. The above ad does not need satire.

H/T: Anna

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