California State University’s Coca-Cola Space Science Center unveils an interactive exhibit exhibit

California State University’s Coca-Cola Space Science Center unveils an interactive exhibit exhibit


Columbus, Georgia (WRBL) — November 8 is National STEM Day, a time to celebrate STEM education and encourage students to pursue careers in these fields. Columbus State University’s Coca-Cola Space Science Center is a big supporter of this initiative, having just added a new exhibit geared toward young learners.

The center opened its doors to the public Wednesday evening for a ribbon-cutting ceremony, which highlighted the new “Guzzle Vortex” exhibition exhibit.


The interactive exhibit is designed to spark conversations with our young people about STEM studies such as aerodynamics, interstellar travel and the possibility of life on other planets.

The Guzzle Vortex allows children to feed alien food. The food then travels through an air maze, or transparent tubes. This complex design teaches kids about aerodynamics and the ongoing search for extraterrestrial life.

We wanted to engage students at an early age with the idea that engaging in the scientific or technical areas of life is fun.
Sean Crozen, executive director of the California State University Coca-Cola Space Science Center

Crozen says some of his former students have gotten jobs at NASA or other professional observatories. He says introducing scientific knowledge at an early age can make a big difference in future STEM leaders.

I know this because I speak from my own experience. It wasn’t until I got more involved in looking at the night sky and amateur astronomy that I said, “Well, can I have a career in this field?” And that’s what really changed me, being able to say, “Yes, I think I can do hard math.” Yes, I believe I can overcome difficult scientific concepts.
Sean Crozen, executive director of the California State University Coca-Cola Space Science Center

The exhibit, which cost about $10,000, was made possible by donations from Pratt & Whitney, part of their longstanding partnership with the center that has lasted nearly 30 years.

The minute I walked in the door here, the first thing I thought about was my two sons, and how we begin to shape their experiences as they head off to school and what they want to be when they grow up. So I think this is an introduction to the first step in that.
Jason Kosmas, general manager of Pratt & Whitney Columbus Motor Center

The exhibition is available to all learners. “Dwell time,” or the average time kids interact with the exhibit, ranges from 30 to 45 minutes, Kroesen says.

Center staff with experience in museum studies and electrical and graphic design worked on the project for six months.

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